New Hope Methodist

New Hope United Methodist Church, Rowesville, Orangeburg County, South Carolina
New Hope United Methodist Church, Rowesville, Orangeburg County, South Carolina

New Hope Methodist was founded in 1825 and the church moved to this current location in Rowesville, South Carolina in 1905.

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Society Hill Churches

Society Hill Presbyterian Church, Society Hill, South Carolina
Society Hill Presbyterian Church, Society Hill, South Carolina

Society Hill Presbyterian (above) organized in 1891 and temporarily held services in a local school until this South Carolina church was built in 1893.

Trinity Episcopal Church was organized in 1833 and their original building shown below was built the following year.  It was the first and only Episcopal church in the county until 25 years later since most of Darlington County’s residents at the time were Baptist.  The church has been inactive since 1931, though holds an annual service in April.

Trinity Episcopal Church, Society Hill, South Carolina
Trinity Episcopal Church, Society Hill, South Carolina

Ruffin Churches

St. John Methodist Church, Ruffin, South Carolina
St. John Methodist Church, Ruffin, South Carolina

While passing through the small town of Ruffin, South Carolina, I spotted a pair of small churches off of the Low Country Highway on Double Churches Road.  The town of Ruffin was named after a Virginia farmer who moved to South Carolina in the mid 1800s.  Edmund Ruffin was a strong supporter of secession and local legend has it that he fired the first shot at Fort Sumter.  He ended up committing suicide after the Civil War ended.

St. John Methodist Church (above) was built in the early 1900s, though not much has been saved on its early history.  Ruffin Baptist (below)  formed in 1923 and built this small wood frame church.

Ruffin Baptist Church, Ruffin, South Carolina
Ruffin Baptist Church, Ruffin, South Carolina

Sheldon Ruins

Old Sheldon Church Ruins, formerly Prince William Parish Church,
Old Sheldon Church Ruins, formerly Prince William Parish Church, near Yemassee, South Carolina

From the historical marker by the church:

“Prince William’s Parish Church (Sheldon Church) was built circa 1751-1757 and partially burned during the American Revolution, with its interior and roof rebuilt 1825-1826.  This Anglican church was primarily paid for by Lt. Gov. William Bull who is buried here.  It is often called Sheldon, after Bull’s plantation.  Local loyalists burned the church in 1779 during a raid by Gen. Augustine Prevost.  It was assumed by many area residents in 1865 and has widely been believed since that Federal troops burned Sheldon Church during the last months of the Civil War.  It was actually dismantled by local freedman circa 1865-1867.”

The church is located in a rural area in South Carolina’s low country in Beaufort County.

 

Little River Baptist

Little River Baptist Church, Jenkinsville, South Carolina (Fairfield County)
Little River Baptist Church, Jenkinsville, South Carolina (Fairfield County)

Little River Baptist Church is in Jenkinsville, South Carolina.  The Greek Revival building was completed sometime around 1845.  The rural church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as being one of the older Baptist churches in South Carolina.  It was damaged by Union troops during the Civil War, but was in use through the early 20th century, until closing after members joined churches in the surrounding communities.  Shortly after World War II, the church reopened and appears well maintained today.

Church of the Epiphany

Church of the Epiphany, Eutawville, South Carolina (Orangeburg County)
Church of the Epiphany, Eutawville, South Carolina (Orangeburg County)

The Church of the Epiphany is located in Eutawville, South Carolina and has a long history as described on this Episcopal church’s website.  There were earlier church buildings used by the English settlers in the region, but a chapel was built in 1849 for the planters who spent their summers in town and was it consecrated as an Episcopal church a century later in 1949.