Little Dutch Church

Little Dutch Church, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Little Dutch Church is located in Halifax, Nova Scotia and is the second oldest building in the city.  Originally known as St. George’s Church, The church was consecrated in 1760 and is also the oldest Lutheran church in Canada.  Although built in the Cape Cod style, the building has been modified over the years to include a bell tower and steeple.  The church also has a cemetery and continues to hold regular services.

Little Dutch Church, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Cemetery at the Little Dutch Church, Halifax, Nova Scotia
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All Saints Anglican

All Saints Anglican Church, Rossway, Digby County, Nova Scotia
All Saints Anglican Church, Rossway, Digby County, Nova Scotia, Canada

All Saints Anglican Church is on the way to Digby, Nova Scotia.  A small cemetery surrounds this combination of 18th century British Classicism and Colonial American meeting house style of construction.  The church was built in 1845  and includes a square bell tower and gabled roof.  It’s the oldest church still standing in Digby Neck and is included on the Canadian Register of Historic Places.

St. John’s Anglican

St. John's Anglican Church and Cemetery, Necum Teuch, Nova Scotia
St. John’s Anglican Church and Cemetery, Necum Teuch, Nova Scotia

St. John’s Anglican Church in Necum Teuch, Nova Scotia was built in 1895. The area is a few miles northeast of Sheet Harbour and the odd-sounding town name is thought to be a corruption of an old Indian name meaning “soft sand place”.  Just west of the church is an even older schoolhouse rebuilt in 1886.  A cemetery with approximately three hundred graves surrounds the building with markers dating back to 1830, although there are some recent burials as well.

St. Alphonsus Catholic

St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic Church, Victoria Mines, Nova Scotia
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic Church, Victoria Mines, Nova Scotia

St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic Church commands attention at the top of a hill overlooking Sydney Harbor in Nova Scotia, Canada.  It was built in 1916 and closed less than a century later in 2007.  Since then, it’s been fighting to avoid demolition and today it’s fate hasn’t yet been sealed.  There’s a tentative plan to sell the church to a restoration group, but the financial dealings are not all in place, so time will tell.