Burnt Corn Churches

Burnt Corn Methodist Church, Burnt Corn, Alabama
Burnt Corn Methodist Church, Burnt Corn, Alabama

The little community of Burnt Corn, Alabama had the best name of the places I visited in the state.  There are several different stories on how the town got its name.  One is that white settlers burned the resident Creek Indian’s corn fields.  A second is that the Indians burned the settler’s corn fields to drive them out of the area when they were establishing a community.  A third is that an injured Indian had to stay behind while his group was traveling through and the other Indians left him some corn to eat.  Once he healed and left, the corn burned in his camp fire and other travelers noted the place as where the corn had burnt.  That last one seems a bit far fetched, but who knows.  Another claim to fame for the town was it was part of the main artery for soldiers traveling during the War of 1812 and the Civil War.  That included Andrew Jackson, who passed through on his way to the Battle of New Orleans.

At the junction of the town there are a pair of churches and some old wooden buildings.  Burnt Corn Methodist Church (above) was built in 1912.  The church organized in 1908 and met in the two-story building shown below (now the Post Office), until their church was built.   The Bethany Baptist Church (below) was established in 1821.  The church below is the third location for the group and was built in 1874.  When this church was built, the African American members remained in the same location of the second church and worshiped separately.  When the white members built this newer church, they also exhumed many of the dead at the previous location and buried them next to this building.  Both churches still use the same name, though the African American group apparently calls theirs “Beth-anne” according to a website with some history of the town.

Old Bethany Baptist Church, Burnt Corn, Alabama
Old Bethany Baptist Church, Burnt Corn, Alabama
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Uniontown Churches

Quin Chapel AME Church, Uniontown, Alabama
Quin Chapel AME Church, Uniontown, Alabama

Uniontown, Alabama was a plantation community that evolved into a trading center as wealthy eastern planters bought large tracts of nearby land in the 19th century.  It was named after Uniontown, Maryland, which was the former home of one of the early wealthy settlers of the area.  There are several buildings detailed on the town’s National Register listing, including a few churches.  The black members of the Uniontown Methodist Church shown below withdrew after the end of the War Between the States and started meeting in a brush arbor near the location of their current church.  Their first building was destroyed in a storm and they built the church above in 1902.  It has a unique side steeple and Gothic arched windows.

Uniontown United Methodist Church, Uniontown, Alabama
Uniontown United Methodist Church, Uniontown, Alabama

The United Methodist Church is the oldest church in Uniontown (circa 1857) and is a Greek Revival brick building.  The church is largely original except the addition of stained glass windows added during a renovation in 1921.  It also had a larger steeple, but was replaced with a smaller one when its weight started creating cracks in the walls.

Perdue Hill Churches

Perdue Hill Presbyterian Church, Perdue Hill, Alabama (Monroe County)
Perdue Hill Presbyterian Church, Perdue Hill, Alabama (Monroe County)

There are two churches side by side on Highway 84 in Perdue Hill, Alabama.  The church above has been used by every denomination in the area over the years.  It was built some time around 1880 and generally known as the Union Church.

Barbara Locklin Baptist Church, Perdue Hill, Alabama
Barbara Locklin Baptist Church, Perdue Hill, Alabama

The other church is known as Barbara Locklin Baptist Church. It was founded in 1888, and from what I can piece together, named after the wife of a businessman named Charles Locklin, who grew wealthy from the steamboat business and retired in Perdue Hill.

First Presbyterian

First Presbyterian Church, Eutaw, Alabama (Greene County)
First Presbyterian Church, Eutaw, Alabama (Greene County)

First Presbyterian is a Greek Revival style church in Eutaw, Alabama.  The building was completed in 1851 along with the congregation changing its name from the Mesopotamia Presbyterian Church to the First Presbyterian Church of Eutaw.  First Presbyterian is included on the National Register of Historic Places.

First Presbyterian Church, Eutaw, Alabama (Greene County)
First Presbyterian Church

Alabama Churches

Gastonburg Presbyterian Church, Gastonburg, Alabama (Wilcox County)
Gastonburg Presbyterian Church, Gastonburg, Alabama (Wilcox County)

Gastonburg Presbyterian Church is a Greek Revival building completed around 1890.  Although Gastonburg, Alabama is a very small community, services are still held in the summer months.

Mt. Carmel Church, Selma, Alabama (Dallas County)
Mt. Carmel Church, Selma, Alabama (Dallas County)

I passed Mt. Carmel Church on the way to visit Everdale Baptist, near Selma, Alabama.  I took a photo before the sun set, but unsure of any history.

Seventh Day Adventist Church, Gilbertown, Alabama (Choctaw County)
Seventh Day Adventists Church, Gilbertown, Alabama (Choctaw County)

This church in Gilbertown, Alabama was built sometime around 1923 by the Seventh Day Adventists.  Later it was sold to the First United Pentecostals, but today it is privately owned.

St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baldwin County, Alabama
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Baldwin County, Alabama

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Magnolia Springs, Alabama was built in 1901.  The Gothic Revival style building was blown off the foundation by a 1916 hurricane, but survived and continues to hold services today.  It’s listed on the National Register.

Siloam Baptist Church, Wilcox County, Alabama
Siloam Baptist Church, Wilcox County, Alabama

This simple church in Wilcox County, Alabama looks to be pieced together with a variety of styles.   I spotted it off a backroad but can’t say how old it is.

St. Peter's Parish Church, Mobile County, Alabama
St. Peter’s Parish Church, Mobile County, Alabama

St. Peter the Apostle Parish Roman Catholic Church was built in 1878 and served as a mission church for the southern Alabama area.  The parishioners included the Creole community who largely spoke corrupted French and some English.

New Hope Baptist Church, Beatrice, Alabama
New Hope Baptist Church, Beatrice, Alabama

A Greek Revival building built in 1870, New Hope Baptist Church is also listed on the National Register.  Built of heart pine logs and timbers, the church is down a small road in the Beatrice, Alabama community.  Although there remains a small cemetery next to the church, the old schoolhouse no longer exists.

New Hope Baptist Church, Beatrice, Alabama
New Hope Baptist Church, Beatrice, Alabama

Bethel Baptist

Bethel Baptist Church, McKinley, Alabama (Marengo County)
Bethel Baptist Church, McKinley, Alabama (Marengo County)

Bethel Baptist Church is in a rural setting in Marengo County, Alabama.  The church was founded in 1821, though I’m not sure that this church dates that far back.  The community of McKinley was settled in 1821, grew rapidly in the 1850s and was the center of about thirty plantations.  A fire destroyed much of the town in 1860 and the area never recovered after the Civil War and the decline of the agricultural industry.

mckinleyhouse
Abandoned house, McKinley, Alabama