Church of the Mediator

Episcopal Church of the Mediator, Micanopy, Florida
Episcopal Church of the Mediator, Micanopy, Florida

Micanopy, Florida is a very small and quaint, “old Florida” town just north of Ocala.  It was founded in 1821 and named for a Seminole indian chief. This church, originally built in the 1870s, was Presbyterian until the 1960s when it became vacant and purchased by the Episcopal congregation that own it today.

Episcopal Church of the Mediator, Micanopy, Florida
Episcopal Church of the Mediator, Micanopy, Florida

Silver Springs Shores Presbyterian

Silver Springs Shores Presbyterian Church, Marion County, Florida
Silver Springs Shores Presbyterian Church, Marion County, Florida

Silver Springs Shores Presbyterian Church was built in 1886 and originally was a little south of its current location near Ocala, Florida.  It was moved in the mid 1970s to Silver Springs Shores and remodeled about twenty years ago.

Holy Trinity Episcopal

Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Ridgeland, South Carolina (Jasper
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Ridgeland, South Carolina (Jasper County)

Built circa 1858, the Church of the Holy Trinity is architecturally Carpenter Gothic.  It’s a small church with a bell tower near Ridgeland, South Carolina (very close to Euhaw Baptist).  The area was considered a summer resort for planters in the nineteenth century.   The interior of the church is considered noteworthy for its hammer-beam timber roof.  The church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Interior (from the National Register of Historic Places application)

Dinwiddie Presbyterian

Church, City, State, County
Dinwiddie Presbyterian Church, Hillsville, Virginia

Dinwiddie Presbyterian is another rural church in western Virginia (Carroll County).  The stone building is relatively young, having been built in 1948.  It was one of the last of the six stone churches built by a Presbyterian minister named Robert Childress.  The church was organized in 1897 and is included on the National Register of Historic Places.  At the same location, there’s an associated cemetery also bordered by the same type of fieldstone.

Mitchell Methodist

Mitchell United Methodist, Glascock County, Georgia
Mitchell United Methodist, Glascock County, Georgia

I’ve passed this church in Mitchell, Georgia at least twice driving around Georgia, but it always has been in the middle of the day when the light was the harshest.  It’s located in a small town, and it’s clear it’s still used and well taken care of.  Unfortunately, nobody was around when I took these photos so I’m unsure of the age and history of the church.

St. Andrews Catholic

St. Andrews Roman Catholic Church, Roanoke, Virginia
St. Andrews Roman Catholic Church, Roanoke, Virginia

Due to restrictions on Roman Catholic worship in Virginia in the early days of European settlement, it took some time to establish the church in the state.  Most of the early Catholic population settled and built churches in the western part of the state, including in Roanoke.

This Gothic cathedral was built in 1902, replacing a small earlier church building.  The large stained glass windows were imported from Germany and the altar marble from Italy.  The exterior is brick and sandstone.  The last major restoration was in 2014, though it was still partially in scaffolding when I visited in December.

A good short history of this church is at their website here and some video of the exterior is on Youtube.  The church is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Target Methodist

Target United Methodist Church, Holly Hill, South Carolina (Orangeburg County)
Target United Methodist Church, Holly Hill, South Carolina (Orangeburg County)

Target Methodist is in Orangeburg County, South Carolina.  The historical marker outside of the church and cemetery reads-

This church, founded about 1800, is one of the oldest Methodist congregations in this part of the state.  It takes its name from Target Branch, a nearby tributary of Four Holes Swamp.  The name “Target” is thought to be a corruption of the “tar gates” along the edges of the swamp, where tar, turpentine, and timber were harvested.  It held its first services in a brush arbor, with a sycamore stump for a pulpit.  It was one of several congregations long served by circuit riders, on the Cypress Circuit 1810-1855, then on the Providence Circuit 1855-1916.  It’s first permanent church, a log building, was rebuilt as a frame sanctuary in 1830.  A second frame church built in 1873 was replaced by the present sanctuary in 1920.  The cemetery here includes graves dating as early as 1820.”