Salisbury Churches

Old Baptist Meeting House, Salisbury, New Hampshire
Old Baptist Meeting House, Salisbury, New Hampshire

It’s fall again in New England and a great time to be driving through the countryside of New Hampshire and Vermont.  There are also a lot of country churches among the colorful trees including a pair in Salisbury, New Hampshire.  The first church (above) was the Old Baptist Meeting House, completed in 1794.  Originally, like many of the other New England churches, it had boxed pews, but those were replaced in 1839 with pews more commonly seen today.  By the 1920s the Baptists were no longer using the building and later deeded the property to the town of Salisbury in 1956.  The town’s historical society eventually took the property for $1 and repaired several issues, including replacement of the steeple blown off during a 1938 storm.   Although the interior wasn’t open, the exterior looks to be in great shape today.

Salisbury Community Church, Salisbury, New Hampshire
Salisbury Community Church, Salisbury, New Hampshire

Salisbury Congregational Community Church is nearby and was completed by 1791 as the town’s Meeting House.  The town’s history is unclear as to when it became the Congregational Church, but it was most likely by the early 1800s.

Salisbury Community Church, Salisbury, New Hampshire
Salisbury Community Church, Salisbury, New Hampshire
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First Congregational

First Congregational Church, Turton, South Dakota (Spink County)
First Congregational Church, Turton, South Dakota (Spink County)

The National Register of Historic Places lists the First Congregational Church in Turton to have been built in 1893.  The plaque on the church shows 1892, but either way an older pioneer church in South Dakota.  The “Country Gothic” style features a center tower and steeple with an open belfry and spire.  The church was locked when I stopped by, so I included an interior photo taken through the window.  Its history says that services were discontinued in 1963.

Bethel Norwegian Lutheran

Bethel Norwegian Lutheran Church, near Harvey, North Dakota (Wells County)
Bethel Norwegian Lutheran Church, near Harvey, North Dakota (Wells County)

Driving along a rural highway, you can’t miss this church.  Surrounded only be farmland, Bethel Norwegian Lutheran has been fighting the North Dakota winters since 1915. When this part of the state was more active, the trains would pass nearby and small towns marked the stops every few miles.  The closest town is Harvey, about 10 miles west.  Although small, the cemetery beside the church is still active.

Friendship Baptist

Friendship Baptist, Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Friendship Baptist Church, Oglethorpe County, Georgia

Just south of Lexington, Georgia, is Friendship Baptist Church, dating from the late 1800s. There is a small cemetery behind the building and an old brick baptismal just down the small slope in front of the church.  I photographed this church late in the day just before the shadows completely took over.

Abba Baptist

Abba Baptist Church, Irwin County, Georgia
Abba Baptist Church, Irwin County, Georgia

Abba Baptist Church is in an isolated spot in Irwin County, Georgia.  The church organized in 1889 and this building was completed in 1907.   The name used by the congregation has changed over the years, starting with Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church, then New Mt. Zion at Abba and then to Abba Missionary Baptist Church.

Richland Presbyterian

Richland Presbyterian Church, South Carolina
Richland Presbyterian Church, South Carolina

Several miles southeast of Columbia is the historic Richland Presbyterian Church. Founded in 1883, the church was built a year later and used until the early 1920s when a new brick church was built in a neighboring town. The frame building features a tower with a gothic-arched portal and is essentially unaltered since construction.  It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.  A cemetery lies just behind the church.